Educational Program Info

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Welcome to the One More Generation Plastic and Recycling Awareness Week program. One More Generation is a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization dedicated to the preservation of endangered species and our environment.

The goal of OMG is to ensure all endangered species survive at least One More Generation . . . and beyond. This program was developed as a way to further educate your students about the impacts of plastic, plastic pollution, and recycling.

The founders of One More Generation are two enterprising elementary students: Carter (age 11.5) and his sister Olivia (age 10) who care deeply about our environment and about saving endangered species. Their goal with this program is to educate and excite students to get involved with being part of the solution to our ever-growing plastic pollution problem and the need to recycle.

As explained throughout this Teacher’s Guide, 21st Century Skills are strongly embedded in each session through problem solving, innovation, critical thinking and contextual learning. Media is discussed and analyzed and students communicate their thoughts with each other after each instructional session. Content is engaging for all learners through active learning strategies, and there are specific opportunities for students to take action based on their new knowledge.

Introduction to the Teacher’s Guide

One More Generation has developed this Teacher’s Guide to accompany our Plastic and Recycling Awareness Week program through the generous support of Novelis.

We hope you and your colleagues will use it to help you share the impacts of plastics on the environment and the benefits of recycling with the young people with whom you work. The program can be used with children ages 5 to 12, particularly in schools, as well as organizations such as Boys & Girls Clubs, Boy and Girl Scouts, or as part of other community organizations or church groups. This Teacher’s Guide is intended to provide you with an overview of the entire Plastic and Recycling Awareness Week, as well as detailed lesson plans for each of the 5 days in the program.

Program Overview

Learning Objectives

• Students will gain a greater understanding of the need to carefully use all resources in ways that are not wasteful and damaging to the environment —both now and in the future.

• Students will gain a greater understanding of the threats facing a variety of organisms, including endangered species, and the need to reduce plastic pollution and aluminum waste.

• Students will understand that they can personally play an important role in reducing plastic pollution and increasing recycling rates for a healthier environment.

• Students will gain a greater understanding of the different types of plastics, and which can and cannot be recycled.

• Students will learn more about different states of matter and how plastic and aluminum can be changed into different states and reformed during the recycling process.

• Students will learn that aluminum beverage cans and certain plastics are excellent examples of closed-loop recycling and learn how recycling cans can save energy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

• Students will understand that recycling involves a firsthand commitment to making the environment healthier.

Subject Areas: Science, Art, and English Language Arts

Grade Level: K-6 (Ages 5-12)

Time: Five 60-minute periods on successive days

Learning Standards Met By Program

Next Generation Science Standards

Organisms and Their Environments

• Use observations to describe how plants and animals depend on the air, land, and water where they live to meet their needs, and they in turn, can change their environment. (Days 1, 2)

• Provide evidence that humans’ uses of natural resources can affect the world around them, and share solutions that reduce human impact. (Days 1, 2, 3, 4, 5)

Environmental Impacts on Organisms

• Use models to evaluate how environmental changes in a habitat affect the number and types of organisms that live there; some remain, move in, move out, and/or die. (Day 2)

• Use evidence to argue that some changes in an organism’s habitat can be beneficial or harmful to the organism. (Days 2, 5)

Structure and Properties of Matter

• Make observations that matter exists as different materials, which can be described and classified by their observable properties and their uses. (Days 3, 4)

• Compare and share observations of solids and liquids at room temperature.

(Day 4)

• Ask questions and share information about the natural materials from which human-made products are built. (Days 1, 2, 4)

Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing

• Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Day 3, Adaptations/Extensions on other days)

• Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach. (Day 3, Adaptations/Extensions on other days)

Plastic and Recycling Awareness Week Classroom Kit Contents:

Each Teacher Receives

• Teacher’s Guide with 5 lesson plans for each day of the program

• Age-appropriate environmental book(s) for the classroom

• Set of 10 “Effects of Plastic Pollution” discussion posters

• Set of 10 “Aluminum Can Manufacturing Steps” posters

• “Life Cycle of the Aluminum Can” recycling poster

• Plastic pollution fact sheet

• Reusable water bottle (optional)

• Large reusable shopping bag (optional)

• Large recycle symbol poster

• Two-sided What Do Those Recycle Numbers Mean, Anyway? fact sheet

• Set of glass reusable drinking straws as give-a-ways for students

Each School Receives

• DVD: Bag It: Is your life too plastic?

• DVD: What’s One Can?

• Aluminum/stainless steel water bottle for each child participating in the program (optional), handed out on Day 1 of the program.

• Reusable shopping bag (optional) for each child participating in the program.  The bags are decorated on Day 2 of the program.

• Large canvas on which to paint a mural (8′ x 16′)

• OMG Access Code Cards for each child and teacher participating in the program

• Letter to parents to be copied and sent home or emailed to all families

• Sample press release

Each School Granted Access to OMG Resource Center

(www.onemoregeneration.org)

• OMG Introductory Video (to be played for all students on Day 1)

• Certificate of Completion (accessible from the OMG website via a special OMG Access Code)

• 10 Ways to Reduce Plastic In Your Home fact sheet

• Informative environmental videos and support materials to help families and teachers continue the education

Day 1 – Introduction to Plastic and Recycling Awareness

Lesson Overview

In this lesson, students will be introduced to One More Generation and the mission of its founders, Carter and Olivia Ries, to ensure that each endangered species survives for at least one more generation. Starting on day one of the

Plastic and Recycling Awareness Week, students will learn about plastic pollution and recycling, and the ways they can personally make a difference to help the environment.

Lesson Objectives

• Students will gain a greater understanding of the threats facing a variety of organisms, including endangered species, and the need to reduce plastic pollution and to always recycle aluminum.

• Students will understand that they can personally play an important role in reducing plastic pollution and increasing recycling rates for a healthier environment.

Subject Area: Science

Grade Level: K-6 (Ages 5-12)

Time: 60 minutes

Next Generation Science Standard

Organisms and Their Environments

• Provide evidence that humans’ uses of natural resources can affect the world around them, and share solutions that reduce human impact.

Day 2 – Plastic Pollution: Effects and Solutions

Lesson Overview

Standards require that students understand the needs of organisms and their relationships with the environment. This lesson uses powerful photographic imagery to help students develop an understanding of how plastic pollution affects the ability of organisms to meet their needs and survive. Optional: Students discuss ways to reduce plastic pollution and create their own reusable cloth shopping bags with artistic educational messaging to spread the word about the need to reduce plastic pollution.

Lesson Objectives

• Students will understand the effects of plastic pollution on living organisms.

• Students will be more aware of simple changes each one of us can incorporate into our daily lives which will have an immediate impact on our environment.

• Students will think critically about their role in reducing plastic pollution and be motivated to take responsible action to reduce the problem.

Subject Areas: Science and Art

Grade Level: K-6 (Ages 5-12)

Time: 60 minutes

Next Generation Science Standards

Organisms and Their Environments

• Use observations to describe how plants and animals depend on the air, land, and water where they live to meet their needs, and they in turn, can change their environment.

• Provide evidence that humans’ uses of natural resources can affect the world around them, and share solutions that reduce human impact.

Environmental Impacts on Organisms

• Use models to evaluate how environmental changes in a habitat affect the number and types of organisms that live there; some remain, move in, move out, and/or die.

• Use evidence to argue that some changes in an organism’s habitat can be beneficial or harmful to the organism.

Day 3 – What Do Those Recycling Numbers Mean?

Lesson Overview

In this lesson, students will learn more about plastics and what the different numbers stamped on them mean. They will learn which are considered safe for recycling and for the environment, in general. Then they will write a poem—as a class or individually—which helps them to remember what they learned.

Lesson Objectives

• Students will gain a greater understanding of the different types of plastics, which plastics are considered safe for recycling, and which types are typically not accepted by community recycling centers.

• Students will learn more about different types of matter and how plastic can be changed into different states and reformed during the recycling process.

• Students will learn more about the writing process and writing poetry.

Subject Area: Science and English Language Arts

Grade Level: K-6 (Ages 5-12)

Time: 60 minutes

Next Generation Science Standards

Structure and Properties of Matter

• Make observations that matter exists as different materials, which can be described and classified by their observable properties and their uses.

Organisms and Their Environments

• Provide evidence that humans’ uses of natural resources can affect the world around them, and share solutions that reduce human impact.

Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing

Standard 4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

Standard 5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

Day 4 – The Power of Aluminum Recycling

Lesson Overview

In this lesson, students will learn about the importance of recycling, with a focus on aluminum can recycling as an example. The steps in the process of aluminummanufacturing and recycling are discussed, including how aluminum can be continuously recycled through “closed-loop recycling.” A variety of interesting statistics are shared, including how much energy can be saved or lost by the students’ actions. Optionally, the lesson closes by taking action to collect trash outside and recycle as much of it as possible. Adaptations/extensions are listed at the end of the lesson, which include additional activities and ideas for how to tailor the lesson to meet the needs of different learners.

Lesson Objectives

• Students will gain a greater understanding of the need to carefully use all resources in ways that are not wasteful and damaging to the environment — both now and in the future.

• Students will learn that aluminum beverage cans are an excellent example of closed-loop recycling and learn how recycling cans saves energy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

• Students will understand that recycling involves a firsthand commitment to making the environment healthier.

Subject Area: Science

Grade Level: K-6 (Ages 5-12)

Time: 60 minutes

Next Generation Science Standards

Structure and Properties of Matter

• Make observations that matter exists as different materials, which can be described and classified by their observable properties and their uses.

• Compare and share observations of solids and liquids at room temperature.

• Ask questions and share information about the natural materials from which human-made products are built.

Organisms and Their Environments

• Provide evidence that humans’ uses of natural resources can affect the world around them, and share solutions that reduce human impact.

Day 5 – Plastic Trash Sculpture or Mural

Lesson Overview

This lesson is designed to allow the students to enjoy working together as a class and celebrate what they learned throughout the week. In the process, concepts such as the need for recycling and protecting the environment for living organisms will be reinforced and acted upon.

Lesson Objectives

• Students will demonstrate their understanding of the effects of plastic pollution and aluminum on living organisms.

• Students will demonstrate their understanding that simple changes each one of us can incorporate into our daily lives can have an immediate impact on our environment.

• Students will demonstrate that they understand their role in reducing plastic pollution and recycling aluminum increases their motivation to take responsible action to reduce the problem.

Subject Areas: Science and Art

Grade Level: K-6 (Ages 5-12)

Time: 60 minutes

Next Generation Science Standards

Organisms and Their Environments

• Provide evidence that humans’ uses of natural resources can affect the world around them, and share solutions that reduce human impact.

Environmental Impacts on Organisms

• Use evidence to argue that some changes in an organism’s habitat can be beneficial or harmful to the organism.

Adaptations/Extensions

• Invite members of the school community and/or broader community to view the sculpture. Encourage students to share what they learned throughout the week with the visitors.

• Take photos of the sculpture and day’s events and share them on your school website, social media, etc. Encourage everyone to continue to spread the word about plastic and recycling.

• Have students research the percentage of the world’s population comprised of those from the United States and the percentage of the world’s energy that the U.S consumes. They will learn that although we Americans represent only about five percent of the world’s population, we consume roughly 20 percent of its energy. Remind students that one action we can take for a better world is to use less energy and recycle.

• Write a class pledge to help the environment, incorporating ideas that were learned and expressed by the students throughout the week. Share the pledge with other classrooms. Have students vote school-wide for the best pledge, which can then be adopted by the whole school.

• Have students prepare a letter to local city council members, the mayor, and/ or other community officials, asking for a meeting to discuss the impact of plastic waste on your community and possible alternatives to lessen this impact, including increased recycling. Have students and staff sign the letter.

Conclusion

Providing students with an academic forum to critically discuss and solve environmental issues allows for 21st Century Skills to be applied in an authentic and meaningful way. Students will learn firsthand from their peers how they are affecting their world and how they can be part of the solutions for present challenges as well as the ones they have yet to face. On a larger scale, when student voices work together to increase awareness in the community opportunities arise for the thinking of our youth to be heard and valued.

If these ideals are goals for your learning environment, implementing a successful Plastic and Recycling Awareness Week with your students may be your first step in the right direction

Funding Requirements

The cost for the entire weeklong curriculum including all provided materials and teacher guides ranges from about $10.00 to $16.00 per students depending on the support materials desired for the program.  The full program includes an aluminum reusable water bottle

References

BBC News. “Planet Earth’s New Nemesis.” BBC News. BBC, 8 May 2002. Web. 29 Aug. 2012. <http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/1974750.stm>.

Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts. 2011. National Governors Association Center for Best Practices and Council of Chief State School Officers. All rights reserved. 29 Aug. 2012. Learn more online at <http://www.corestandards.org>.

Daily Mail Reporter. “The Life Cycle of a Plastic Bag.” Daily Mail. 27 Feb. 2008. Web. 29 Aug. 2012. <http://www.dailymail.co.uk/money/bills/article-1620912/The-lifecycle-of-a-plastic-bag.html>.

Doucette, Kitt. “The Plastic Bag Wars.” Rolling Stone. Rolling Stone Mag., 4 Aug. 2011. Web. 29 Aug. 2012. <http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/the-plastic-bagwars-

20110725>.

EarthTalk. “‘Dead’ Sea Of Plastic Bottles.” Scientific American. Scientific American Mag., 23 Oct. 2008. Web. 29 Aug. 2012. <http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.

cfm?id=dead-sea-of-plastic-bottles>.

Gaskill, Melissa. “Trawls and Trash Represent One-Two Punch for Threatened Turtles.”

Scientific American. Scientific American Mag., 15 Jul. 2011. Web. 29 Aug. 2012. <http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=trawls-and-trash-representthreats-for-sea-turtles>

Next Generation Science Standards Public Draft. 2012. National Research Council et al. 29 Aug. 2012. Learn more online at <http://www.nextgenscience.org>.

Partnership for 21st Century Skills. Framework for 21st Century Learning. P21, n.d. Web. 29 Aug. 2012. Learn more online at <www.p21.org>.

“Population and Energy Consumption.” World Population Balance. 2012. Web. 29

Aug. 2012. <http://www.worldpopulationbalance.org/population_energy>. Roach, John. “Are Plastic Grocery Bags Sacking the Environment?” National Geographic News. National Geographic Newspaper, 2 Sept. 2003. Web. 29

Aug. 2012. <http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2003/09/0902_030902_ plasticbags.html>. The Story of Stuff Project. Bottled Water Myth Versus Reality. Download. The Story of Stuff. n.d. Web. 29 Aug. 2012. <http://www.storyofstuff.org/sos_downloads/PDF

For More information

To learn more on how you can get our Plastic and Recycling Awareness Week program in your school or community organization, give us a call or send us an email and we will gladly help you with all the details.

  • Please Donate Today!

    Jack Johnson has again partnered with OMG to help bring our environmental education program to more schools.

    By collaborating with educators OMG has written a curriculum teaching kids about the damaging effects of plastic pollution which is now available to schools nationwide. The weeklong program was written to match the latest National and local State Standards for science education and also has math, literacy and art infused throughout.

    Please help us to bring our program to more public schools by contributing today!

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